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Economic burden-sharing in military alliances

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Published by Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California .
Written in English


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Open LibraryOL25326772M

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Economic burden-sharing in military alliances. - CORE Reader. This Note discusses alliance burden-sharing in the context of multinational provision of a group of goods, including three the author uses to illustrate his discussion — military services, security and economic assistance, and defense and science/technology research. The author formulates a simple and straightforward methodology with which Cited by: 1. The US, NATO and Military Burden-Sharing Cimbala Forster This study establishes that the political, economic and military-technological changes that transform the international system also alter the way in which a state views its and others' responsibilities and burdens for responding to international crises. This chapter provides an overview of the main theoretical and empirical findings in the economics of military alliances. The pure public and joint product models are presented along with the empirical methods used to test them. Issues concerning burden sharing and strategic doctrine in the NATO alliance are discussed.

Richard Zeckhauser entitled “An Economic Theory of Alliances.” The paper was written in , and it aimed at exploring (through economic theory) how burden sharing works within alliances. They concluded that other countries would attempt to free ride on other members within the alliance in .   NATO’s July summit meeting has been one of the most divisive meetings in the Alliance’s history. Regardless of whether NATO can now cover its internal divisions up with some kind of public façade, President Trump’s confrontational bargaining style has divided the U.S. from its allies over other issues like trade and tariffs, how to deal with Russia, the JCPOA agreement with Iran. With the current international security architecture in steep decline, and the threat of conventional regional wars between competing great and regional powers appearing increasingly likely and dangerous, it is incumbent upon the U.S. to quickly shore up its strategic military alliances – specifically in the Americas, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Southwest Asia. and the [ ]. alliances create interdependence between autonomous economic units, bringing new benefits to the partners in the form of intangible assets, and obligating them to make continuing contributions to their partnership. Different alliance forms represent different approaches that.

Abstract We develop a model of alliances with outside options to study burden-sharing in nonbinding alliance agreements. The analysis provides an explanation for the variance in ally contributions. The paper evaluates the differences in burden sharing along political, military, and economic dimensions, specifically NATO's goal for member-states to spend 2% of GDP on defense, and demonstrates that alliance "awareness" and place in the alliance hierarchy due to historical factors can explain whether NATO states meet their burden-sharing goal. This study establishes that the political, economic and military-technological changes that transform the international system also alter the way in which a state views its and others' responsibilities and burdens for responding to international crises. It assesses the distribution of the costs of raising and supporting arms of service, the. The authors appraise a well-known argument connecting economics and security in international relations: military allies are likely to trade more with one another than non-allies. A review of alliance treaties and diplomatic history suggests that, under certain conditions, states may tie together alliance agreements and economic agreements.